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Asia seeks Obama's assurance in territorial spats

National Security Adviser Susan Rice, right, accompanied by Ben Rhodes, deputy National Security Adviser for Strategic Communications and Speechwriting, speaks about President Barack Obama's upcoming trip to Asia, Friday April 18, 2014 , at the White House briefing room in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)WASHINGTON (AP) — As President Barack Obama travels through Asia this coming week, he will find a region that's warily watching the crisis in Ukraine through the prism of its own territorial tensions with China.



South Korean media reports ferry captain's arrest

Investigators arrested Lee Joon-Seok and two of his crew early in the morning. All three have been criticised for abandoning hundreds of passengers trapped in the ferry, as they made their own escape. Lee was charged with negligence and failing to secure the safety of passengers in violation of maritime law.
Four French journalists free after Syria kidnap

This combination shows the four French journalists (left to right) Didier Francois, Edouard Elias, Pierre Torres and Nicolas Henin who have been freed after being held captive for almost a year in SyriaFour French journalists taken hostage in Syria last year were freed on Saturday after a 10-month ordeal in the world's most dangerous country for the media. French President Francois Hollande said Edouard Elias, Didier Francois, Nicolas Henin and Pierre Torres were "in good health despite the very challenging conditions of their captivity". Turkish soldiers found the four men abandoned in no-man's land on the border with Syria overnight Friday-Saturday, wearing blindfolds and with their hands bound, the Turkish news agency Dogan reported. We just came from Syria," Francois was shown saying.



13th body pulled from snow in Everest avalanche

Mother of Nepalese mountaineer Ang Kaji Sherpa, killed in an avalanche on Mount Everest, cries while she waits for his body at Sherpa Monastery in Katmandu, Nepal, Saturday, April 19, 2014. Rescuers were searching through piles of snow and ice on the slopes of Mount Everest on Saturday for four Sherpa guides who were buried by an avalanche that killed 12 other Nepalese guides in the deadliest disaster on the world's highest peak. The Sherpa people are one of the main ethnic groups in Nepal's alpine region, and many make their living as climbing guides on Everest and other Himalayan peaks. (AP Photo/Niranjan Shrestha)KATMANDU, Nepal (AP) — Search teams recovered a 13th body Saturday from the snow and ice covering a dangerous climbing pass on Mount Everest, where an avalanche a day earlier swept over a group of Sherpa guides in the deadliest disaster on the world's highest peak.



Special Report: How the U.S. made its Putin problem worse

File photo of U.S. President Obama meeting with Russian President Putin during the G8 Summit at Lough Erne in EnniskillenBy David Rohde and Arshad Mohammed WASHINGTON AND NEW YORK (Reuters) - In September 2001, as the U.S. reeled from the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, Vladimir Putin supported Washington's imminent invasion of Afghanistan in ways that would have been inconceivable during the Cold War. He agreed that U.S. planes carrying humanitarian aid could fly through Russian air space. He said the U.S. military could use airbases in former Soviet republics in Central Asia. And he ordered his generals to brief their U.S. counterparts on their own ill-fated 1980s occupation of Afghanistan.





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